Lesson Plan and Materials: Coastal Vulnerability Modeling

 

OVERVIEW

The InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) Coastal Vulnerability model produces a qualitative estimate of such exposure in terms of a Vulnerability Index, which differentiates areas with relatively high or low exposure to erosion and inundation during storms. This lab will focus on the west coast of Vancouver Island as a case study location. Habitats reduce impacts of storms and increase resilience of coastal areas. We will examine the role of habitat in providing protection from coastal hazards. This hands-on lab was developed to introduce students to the geospatial modeling work flow. By engaging in hands-on training students will learn spatial reasoning and problem solving skills necessary to effectively translate science to policy.

The overarching goals of this training are to:

  • Learn geospatial modeling workflow using the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Environmental Services and Tradeoffs).
  • Apply a Coastal Vulnerability Model in InVEST to a case study in British Columbia.
  • Assess the hazard risk to people, property, infrastructure through post-processing and map analysis.


OBJECTIVES

By participating in this training, students will:

  • Learn the geospatial modeling workflow using the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Environmental Services and Tradeoffs).
  • Be able to apply their new skills and create a coastal vulnerability map and role of natural habitat map for the case study location.
  • Build spatial reasoning and problem solving skills necessary to effectively translate science to policy using a GIS.

 

GRADE LEVELS

11-12th Grade/Undergraduate/Graduate; students in geospatial related studies 

 

SUBJECT AREAS

Modeling, Cartography, Environmental law and policy, Geography

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

 

MATERIALS

  1. Coastal Vulnerability Modeling Lab Presentation  PPT | PDF
  2. Coastal Vulnerability Modeling Lab  PDF
  3. Coastal Vulnerability Modeling Lab Data and InVEST software    LINK
  4. Coastal Vulnerability Modeling Lab – reading (Arkema et. al. 2013)   LINK

 

ESTIMATED TIME NEEDED

2-3 hours

 

STANDARDS

Common Core State Standards for Reading in Science and Technical Subjects: Grades 11-12

Standard 2.     Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.

Standard 7.     Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Standard 9.     Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.

 

OCEAN LITERACY PRINCIPLES

Principle 1.   The Earth has one big ocean with many features

  1. Although the ocean is large, it is finite, and resources are limited

 

Principle 6.  The ocean and humans are inextricably interconnected

  1. Humans affect the ocean in a variety of ways. Laws, regulations, and resource management affect what is taken out and put into the ocean. Human development and activity leads to pollution (point source, nonpoint source, and noise pollution), changes to ocean chemistry (ocean acidification), and physical modifications (changes to beaches, shores, and rivers). In addition, humans have removed most of the large vertebrates from the ocean.
  1. Much of the world’s population lives in coastal areas. Coastal regions are susceptible to natural hazards (tsunamis, hurricanes, cyclones, sea level change, and storm surges).

 

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Lisa Wedding, Ph.D.

Gregg Verutes, M.S. 

Laura Good, Ph.D.

Winn McEnery, M.Sc. 

 

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